Last edited by Shakalkis
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

3 edition of Ultrasonic Destruction Of Surfactants (WERF Report) found in the catalog.

Ultrasonic Destruction Of Surfactants (WERF Report)

by L. K. Weavers

  • 185 Want to read
  • 1 Currently reading

Published by IWA Publishing (Intl Water Assoc) .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Water supply & treatment,
  • Earth Sciences - Hydrology,
  • Science,
  • Environmental aspects,
  • Industrial applications,
  • Purification,
  • Sewage,
  • Sonochemistry,
  • Surface active agents,
  • Science/Mathematics

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsLinda K. Weavers (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11904796M
    ISBN 10184339636X
    ISBN 109781843396369

    Ultrasonics - Ultrasonics - Medical applications: Although ultrasound competes with other forms of medical imaging, such as X-ray techniques and magnetic resonance imaging, it has certain desirable features—for example, Doppler motion study—that the other techniques cannot provide. In addition, among the various modern techniques for the imaging of internal organs, ultrasonic devices are. The kinetics and mechanism of the sonolytic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) have been investigated at an ultrasonic frequency of kHz and power of W L The observed first-order degradation rate constant for the loss of MTBE increased from × s-1 to × s-1 as the concentration of MTBE decreased from to by:

    46 Physical Pharmacy 47 ( J mol –1 K), T is temperature in kelvins, c is the concentration in mol m–3 and x has a value of 1 for ionic surfactants in dilute solution. The area A occupied by a surfactant molecule at the solution–air interface can be calculated from A = 1/N A 23Γ 2 where N A is the Avogadro number ( × 10 moleculesFile Size: KB. surfactants). Tween 60 and Sodium Caseinate were selected as the O/W surfactants, monoolein and lecithin as the W/O surfactants. These mixed emulsifier systems were shown to induce long-term emulsion stability against coalescence, regardless of the surfactant type, via a synergistic “two-part”.

    High intensity ultrasonic vibrations were used for destabilizing the static foam structure. Ultrasonic horn as a source of ultrasonic vibration was used for the destruction of the foam. The effect of the ratio of the horn to the column diameter on the drainage and collapse rate of foam has been by: • Ultrasonic reactors alone may not be useful for reducing completely complex wastewaters of high surfactant load. • Application of ultrasonic reactors in combination with other treatment processes including Ozone, UV irradiation, chlorination, Fenton, nanoparticles and H 2 O 2 could be used as a pre-treatment unit in a sequential chemical Cited by: 4.


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Ultrasonic Destruction Of Surfactants (WERF Report) by L. K. Weavers Download PDF EPUB FB2

In addition, the effects of physical properties of surfactants and the effect of ultrasonic frequency were investigated to gain an understanding of the factors affecting degradation. Successful partial or total destruction of surfactants resulting in the release of metals bound to surfactants may result in a significant cost savings of treatment : Paperback.

In addition, the effects of physical properties of surfactants and the effect of ultrasonic frequency were investigated to gain an understanding of the factors affecting degradation.

Successful partial or total destruction of surfactants resulting in the release of metals bound to surfactants may result in a significant cost savings of treatment plants. This research focused on the use of sonication to destroy surfactants and surface tension properties in industrial wastewaters that affect traditional water treatment processes.

We have investigated the sonochemical destruction of surfactants and a chelating agent to understand the release of metals Ultrasonic Destruction Of Surfactants book surfactants during sonication. Ultrasonic Destruction of Surfactants: Application to Industrial Wastewaters Linda K.

Weavers, Gim Yang Pee, J. Aaron Frim, Limei Yang, James F. Rathman ABSTRACT: This research focused on the use of sonication to destroy surfactants and surface tension properties in industrial wastewaters that affect traditional water treatment processes.

Ultrasonic Destruction of Surfactants by L. Weavers is available in these libraries OverDrive (Rakuten OverDrive): eBooks, audiobooks and videos for libraries This research focused on the use of sonication to destroy surfactants and surface tension properties in industrial wastewaters that affect traditional water treatment processes.

We have investigated the sonochemical destruction of surfactants and a chelating agent to understand the release of metals from surfactants during sonication.

In addition, the effects of physical properties of surfactants and the effect of ultrasonic frequency were investigated to gain an understanding of the factors affecting degradation. Ultrasonic Destruction of Surfactants: Application to Industrial Wastewaters Article in Water Environment Research 77(3) May with 74 Reads How we measure 'reads'.

"This book is designed to give practical help to those involved with the use of surface active agents (or surfactants). It is intended particularly for new graduate and post-graduate chemists and chemical engineers at the beginning of their industrial careers and for those who, in later life, become involved with surfactants for the first : Hardcover.

The pH of the solution was following addition of the surfactant and was adjusted to and through the addition of 1 N H 2 SO 4 and 1 N NaOH in the experiments investigating the effect of pH.

The surface tension of the sample solutions at various concentrations was determined with a ring/plate tensiometer (LAUDA, TD1C, Germany) following the methods detailed in previous studies.Cited by: surfactant-related areas the reader is referred to some of the chapters available in specialist books [24–29].

With regard to the occurrence of related colloidal systems in the petroleum industry, three recent books Table 1. Some Examples of Surfactant Applications in the Petroleum Industry Gas/Liquid Systems Producing oilwell and well-head foamsCited by: Powerful ultrasonic shear forces allow to prepare stable, surfactant-free Pickering emulsions using micron- and nano-particles as stabilizer.

Sonication is a non-thermal emulsification process that is already widely used to emulsify w/o- o/w- and w/o/w-systems to produce stable emulsions (e.g. for moisturizers, creams, lotions, sunscreens. Maintaining the features that made the first edition of this book a bestseller, Ultrasonics: Fundamentals, Technology, Applications, Second Edition describes the basic principles, theoretical background, and a wide range of applications of ultrasonic energy.

This edition includes an expanded discussion of beats that now contains mathematical relationships, equations for designing large horns.

Avoiding destruction Creaming Ostwald Ripening Flocculation Coalescence and non-ionic surfactants then this isn’t the book for you. Instead you can read all about them in Wikipedia. Units First, I won’t be using any.

ii LIST OF SURFACTANT TYPES AND TERMS APG – Alkyl polyglucoside Adhesion – The property of a surfactant to adsorb and stick to a solid surface.

AE and C mEO n – A surfactant composed of a straight hydrocarbon chain of m carbon atoms connected to a polyethylene oxide chain of n units via an ether bond. Cloud Point – That temperature of a solution at which a nonionic surfactant. The ultrasonic velocity and absorption are sensitive to any structural changes, such as micelle formation, stacking and transformation from spherical to rod-like shapes of micelle that occur in the surfactant solutions The ultrasonic studies on aqueous solutions of biological surfactants such as bile salts are.

During the last years, many efforts have been devoted to the elimination of alkylphenol ethoxylate surfactants from aqueous systems. In this paper, the sonochemical degradation of aqueous solutions of Triton X was performed at an ultrasonic frequency of kHz and an applied power of 50 W.

Analysis of the reaction products by HPLC-ES−MS suggests that the hydrophobic alkyl chain is the Cited by: Ultrasonic destruction of surfactants: Application to industrial wastewaters - WERF report (Project CTSET).

[Linda K Weavers;] -- This research focused on the use of sonication to destroy surfactants and surface tension properties in industrial wastewaters that.

Ultrasonic Cleaning and Surfactants I've heard that deionized water is a poor conductor of ultrasonic cavitations. Can we add a small amount of a surfactant to improve the ultrasonic effectiveness.

R.P. Expert Panel Responses In short, yes. Deionized water does have a high surface tension, and because the ultrasonic cleaning process relies on.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for WERF Research Report: Ultrasonic Destruction of Surfactants: Application to Industrial Wastewaters(Project CTSEt) by J.

Rathman, J. Frim, L. Weavers and G. Pee (, Paperback) at the best online prices at. Ultrasonic Destruction of Acid Orange 7: Effect of Humic Acid, Surfactants and Complex Matrices Article in Water Environment Research 89(3) March with 76.

Surfactants – classification, features and applications Surfactants – classification, features and applications N. D. Denkov and S. Tcholakova Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Sofia University, Sofia, Bulgaria Lecture at COST P21 Training School “Physics of droplets: Basic and advanced topics”.Ultrasonics, vibrations of frequencies greater than the upper limit of the audible range for humans—that is, greater than about 20 term sonic is applied to ultrasound waves of very high amplitudes.

Hypersound, sometimes called praetersound or microsound, is sound waves of frequencies greater than 10 13 hertz. At such high frequencies it is very difficult for a sound wave to.The concept and structure of the book evolved from early attempts to define chemical structure/property relationships of all the different types of surfactants commercially available, into a simple handbook providing essential background information for the surfactant user.